Romance, Food & Your Appetite for Love & Life

Dating, whether you love it or loathe it, is an indispensable part of the soulmate manifestation process (and regular date nights are essential once you are a couple). Eventually, there will be a “first dinner date.” What you order will let him or her know if you have a healthy appetite for love and life.

On these early dates, we want to let our large appetite for life, our enthusiasm for life, really shine through as much as possible.

For those of you with gluten or other sensitivities (I fall into this category), it might be best just to order something you know is “safe” for you to eat rather than engage in a big conversation with the server, which will lead to a talk about your various ailments which might make you appear “high maintenance.”

If you are vegan or vegetarian, no problem, as long as you aren’t sitting in judgment if your date orders a steak. If you are a strident vegan, and you can’t watch anyone eat meat products, that is something to figure out BEFORE you go out on a dinner date.

For those of you “foodies” out there…be adventurous and let your date know that you love trying new things.  Foodies need to find each other!

One other thought:  Judging how someone else eats, even if you believe they are harming themselves, is toxic to you, not them.

What got me thinking about all of this was a blog I recently read by Katie Oldenburg at www.thefrisky.com on this topic.  Here’s what she thinks your first date food order says about you…you decide for yourself!

Anything With Garlic: I have no self-awareness or foresight … or I don’t like you.

Tacos: I’m impulsive and a short-term thinker.

Burger And Fries: I want something delicious because I’m hungry. It’s not glamorous and you may judge me for it, so go ahead.

Buffalo Wings: I’m adventurous and not afraid of getting down and dirty.

Pasta: I’m a romantic. There’s something seductive about a savory plate of pasta, as long as sauce isn’t dripping all over the place.

Steak: I’m dominant and powerful. Anybody who wants to slice into a big filet with a steak knife says “I’m in control” (and maybe that attitude will spill into the bedroom later on).

Chicken: I play it safe. May be perceived as boring.

Pizza: I’m down-to-earth. I’m not too uppity, but I also might not be very adventurous.

Meatloaf: I’m not here to impress you. There’s nothing impressive or sexy about meatloaf, therefore there’s nothing impressive or sexy about this date.

Quesadilla: I’m fun, easy going and playful.

Surf And Turf: I’m fancy, sort of materialistic and don’t care about money, because you’re paying.

Salmon: I like you and consider your feelings. I chose a lean piece of fish that’s not too smelly or hearty, tastes good and is classy.

Chicken Fingers: I am a child trapped in an adult’s body and am unaware that you’re probably judging me.

One last thought.  When I was dating, I would generally eat something before going out to dinner, because I didn’t want anyone to see just how ravenous I can become when I get hungry and I am a super sloppy, messy eater.  I would generally order something that I liked ”enough” that wouldn’t end up all over me or them.

Wishing you love, laughter, and magical kisses,

Arielle

Love, Life and What Is Most Needed

One day, many years ago, Brian and I were in Tiffany’s, simply browsing all the pretty shiny and sparkling things.  As we looked through the glass cabinet at a diamond bracelet, a very elegant man in a suit, behind the counter, asked if I would like to try it on.  I immediately said to him: “Oh no thanks, I certainly don’t need anything like this.”

His instant reply floored me: “Madam, this is not about “need,” this is all about “want.”

He was right, and in that moment he gave me a distinction I had never thought about: the difference between “need” vs. “want.”

Our basic needs: air, food, water, shelter, security are obviously the most important ones and essential to life.

But, what about everything else?

Some examples:

cars2I want to eat cheesecake, red velvet cupcakes, macadamia nut chocolate chip cookies and gobs of pasta.  I am gluten and sugar sensitive, so I need to eat healthy foods. The choice is up to me.  My “wants” can hurt me.

I want to drive the big, expensive Tesla sedan.  And, I work from home and only need a very small car to get to the market in.

Now, does that mean I can’t ever have my “wants?”

No, of course not, but knowing the difference is very useful when making decisions (And, I indulge my sweet tooth nearly every day, but I limit myself to 3 small bites.)

For those of you seeking your soulmate, it’s often hard to discern between a want and a need.  One way to do it is to ask yourself this question: “Will this want/need contribute to my long-term happiness?”  If this answer is yes, then I would put it in the “need” category.

I have learned over the years that the more I let go of my “wants” and get comfortable and committed to handling my needs, knowing that I always have “enough” makes my life easier, more fun and certainly more peaceful.

Wishing you love, laughter, and magical kisses,

Arielle

 

P.S. If your heart’s desire is to manifest the love of your life, and you are willing to dedicate your time, attention and intention to making it happen, then I invite you to join me August 19-21 at the beautiful Omega Institute to discover how to quickly and easily make it happen! (This is the only time this year I am offering this weekend workshop)